A critique of catherine clintons book the plantation mistress

They very few purposely remained unmarried and did so because of the work and position they had observed were put upon any woman as a "wife" role. And just as this author noted, most of the women were used up WAY before the men.

Because eventually the last Mistress Laura left the plantation for New Orleans life, and refused her inheritance just because of the isolation and responsibility it required. One begins to realize that the mistress of the plantation had responsibilities far in excess of simply taking care of her husband's desires and immediate family needs.

It was a terrible dichotomy and horrible system that required a whole core message of intermittent pretending all around, IMHO. Isolation was one of the greatest hardships of plantation life, along with continual childbearing, considered the most important role of a post-Revolutionary wife. Some of them did not appeared bothered by the disdain for being not chosen.

February 11, By Sonia W. Despite laws prohibiting a woman from owning slaves and the lack of adequate education, responsibility for running the entire plantation often fell on her shoulders in the absence of her husband.

The tall, white and fair-haired Chachapoyas of the Andean forest have, alas, no remnants left to sue the Incas for genocide in a Peruvian court of law. Too much emphasis has been placed on deconstructing the myth of the Southern belle, which seems to lead to the other extreme, which makes the Southern woman a pathetic, mindless figure.

The size of the plantation and the time period play important roles in these women lives. Statistics drawn from her systematic study are found in the several appendixes. Instead, aggressive White androphobes of all genders which I can no longer count are decimating the philogynous and egalitarian West.

Clinton doesn't avoid controversial subjects exploited in recent fiction about the antebellum era. Most often, she also served as mediator in troubles between the master and slaves, many times softening the punishment.

Some of these women Clinton writes about were spinsters, despite the title. When they married, they became the property of their husbands, and so did any land or valuables they may have owned.

Far from the life of leisure, women were really prisoners of the southern male system. However, even that great moral abyss of Western civilization — the Holocausts — stands out more in its industrialized and organizational features than it does either in the quality of its hatefulness or its relative or even absolute volumes.

Clinton puts a small focus on women in the South, such as Angela Grimke, who dismissed her traditional role as a Southern woman and went on to become an abolitionist crusader. Despite laws prohibiting a woman from owning slaves and the lack of adequate education, responsibility for running the entire plantation often fell on her shoulders in the absence of her husband.

They very few purposely remained unmarried and did so because of the work and position they had observed were put upon any woman as a "wife" role. And all of this was done in the isolation of the plantation, which the mistress rarely left, due to strict rules requiring the chaperoning of white women.

The chapter that included the "oppression" that these women felt- was truly interesting. February 11, By Sonia W. Sexual indiscretions were not uncommon in Southern society.

The Plantation Mistress

And just as this author noted, most of the women were used up WAY before the men. Apr 18, Jeanette rated it liked it It's good. Fortunately, she does move on to present a more complete image of the plantation mistress and offers a more fair assessment of the South in general.

The Plantation Mistress

When visiting antebellum plantations in Louisiana last winter, we went to about 7. Is it more humane to go by a stroke of a blunt machete than by a whiff of Zyklon B.

In fact, the plantation mistress was caught between her responsibilities to white society and the slaves. Equality psychos are tearing down the most egalitarian society that ever existed except for initial communist experiments, before they turned bloody.

One can be grateful that the recent emphasis on the study of women's history has encouraged this much-needed work. The history of the Third Reich also proves that with the right formula of economic blowup, misery and humiliation, sparked by charismatic evil, no people are immune to such horror, at no time.

Religion, role in providing medicine and food, and the isolation in regard to mobility not allowed to travel without a chaperon and where do you find these.

Her study centers on the elite women who lived on plantations owning twenty or more slaves and their life experiences. In fact, most of the time she was also by produce or foodstuffs, beyond the crops, supplementing HIS debts. She claims much focus has been placed on the southern planter and she wants to create a counterpoint focusing on the women of the plantations.

Myths of Southern women seen; The Plantation Mistress: Woman's World in the Old South, by Catherine Clinton. New York: Pantheon Books. pp. $ "The Plantation Mistress challenges and reinterprets a host of issues related to the Old South.

The result is a book that forces us to rethink some of our basic assumptions about two peculiar institutions -- the slave plantation and the nineteenth-century family.3/5(1).

The Plantation Mistress by Professor Catherine Clinton starting at $ The Plantation Mistress has 1 available editions to buy at Alibris5/5(1).

“The Plantation Mistress challenges and reinterprets a host of issues related to the Old South. The result is a book that forces us to rethink some of our basic assumptions about two peculiar institutions—the slave plantation and the nineteenth-century family.

To combat both the ""New Englandization"" of women's history and the popular sexualization of the Southern woman, Professor Clinton (History and Women's Studies, Union College) searched archival documents in seven Southern states for particulars on the plantation mistress. Plantation Mistress: Woman’s World in the Old South.

By Catherine Clinton. (New York: Pantheon Books,Pp. xix, ) Catherine Clinton sets out to enrich the already vast literature concerning the South, slavery, and debunking the myth of “chivalrous cavaliers and belles in hoop skirts” (p.

xi) in her piece Plantation Mistress. She claims much focus has been placed on the southern planter and she wants .

A critique of catherine clintons book the plantation mistress
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